The Top 10 High-Traffic Websites Of 2013 You’ve Probably Never Heard Of

cadkol

Editor’s note: Not only am I personally aware of Quora, I also use it.  I’m suprised to see it on this list. Anybody who does research for work or fun knows about Quora, or at least they should. I wanna thank my guest today, Romeo Demes. Thanks dude.

About this guest author: Romeo Demes is a technology blogger and IT expert who enjoys sharing his knowledge with others. He stays up to date with all the latest in technology.

There are some websites we simply can’t live without. When any of these go down, even for a couple of minutes, there’s typically major outcry on micro-blogging websites like Twitter. We gave some thought to listing top 10 websites of 2013 that you can’t live without. But then we thought nearly everyone on planet Earth knows these already – What fun is there in looking at a list of website names we use on a day-to-day basis? That’s why we’re taking a slightly different course and listing the top 10 websites of 2013 you might not have heard of. Although we’ve mentioned the Alexa rank of each, Alexa was not the only metric taken into consideration to create the list.

Hubpages

Hubpages simply put, is a user generated content website. The site also shares its advertisement revenue with its contributors. By the end of 2013, Hubpages had a little less than a million hubs (pages). It also provides its users with a great editor to organize content better. Users are generally given a subdomain, much like WordPress or Blogger, where they can write about a specific topic. Although they don’t give access to cPanel and DB like full-blown web hosting services GoDaddy, WMD hosting and others , they do provide tools to embed videos, pictures, surveys, maps and more to enrich pages. There are currently more than 74,000 published users and 2.5 million forum posts.

Imgur

No, it’s not pronounced in a strange way – Imgur is simply pronounced imager. It is an online image hosting service (not to be confused with a web hosting service like Wikia) that’s been around since 2009. Users can upload images they own. The pictures are voted on and shared by the community, much like Flickr. Millions of users upload images to Imgur every day. The site has been gaining more traffic ever since they introduced their simple to use Meme creation tool in June 2013. They also showcase a public archive of all the memes submitted by users.

Quora

The question and answer site which seems to have a more mature community (if compared to a site like Yahoo! Answers for example), skyrocketed to popularity in a short period of time since its launch in 2010. The primary reason for Quora’s success is its social media integration and the inherited features from already successful social networking services like Twitter and Facebook.

Babylon

Like the Baidu toolbar, the Babylon program might also find its way into your computer as ‘freeware’ while installing some other free software. Babylon is not a search engine. It’s primarily a translation and reference program. It is quite notorious for using shady tactics to creep into Windows-based machines. In 2010, Microsoft’s proprietary anti-virus service started identifying Babylon software as Adware – After a couple of weeks, Microsoft announced that Babylon is no longer identified by its anti-virus program as Adware after some changes were made to the software by Babylon.

Wikia

Wikia has been growing in popularity every year since 2004. In the past it called Wikicites and later renamed to Wikia back in 2006. Wikia provides web hosting services and also lets users create pages that look more like an encyclopedia. Currently Wikia receives more traffic than Apple.com with 18 million unique visits each month. One major problem with Wikia is that Wikia owns all the domain names it provides. This makes it hard for people to migrate to other conventional web hosting services.

Go Network

Go.com pulls nearly 30 million unique visits per month. Believe it or not, the Disney-owned web property has been around since the 1990’s. The site was launched in 1999 as a web-portal to showcase news stories from sources like ABCNews, Disney, and ESPN. It was a failure. The site ceased its search engine service, and started making use of a search engine provided by GoTo. There was no major change until 2013, when it was transformed into a landing page with no search engine and the website is still killing it.

Ask

Does this ring a bell in your mind? Okay, it’s not 2002 anymore, but the Ask search engine is still used by millions of users – or maybe we should say forced to – as it changes the home screen and preferred search engines in your browser when you heedlessly click on Next, Next Next, and the next thing you know you’re installing freeware. Ask was eclipsed by more refined and better search engines like Google. It still has an Alexa rank of 35 and was one of the most widely used websites of 2013.

Mail.Ru

This is a Russian internet company, currently the most popular web portal in all of Russia. Mail.Ru owns more than 85% of internet market share in Russia. It is also used in many former Soviet states and holds a position in the top 5 internet companies in the world based on total monthly page views.

QQ

If you’re not a Chinese citizen, you’re likely unaware of this website. QQ is an online portal like Yahoo! that provides services like browser games, chat, micro-blogging, shopping, news, etc. QQ International global communications suite is available in English, French, Japanese, Spanish, German and Korean, with other languages in the pipeline. Formed by Tencent over a decade ago, QQ is now the largest online chat community in the world. There are nearly 780 million registered users in QQ.

Baidu

Baidu is a web services company in China. Baidu is also called by many as the “Chinese Google.” China is probably one of the few countries where Google is not the most-widely used website. In 2010, Google had 29% market share in China; then it fell to 5% by 2012 and it fell further down to 1.5% in 2013. The Chinese communist regime has been a little harsh on the internet giant. Back in 2009 the Chinese government blocked YouTube since Google was reluctant to take down footage of Chinese armed men beating Tibetans. Other Google services like its flagship search engine were also blocked. To bypass Chinese regulations, Google.cn was redirected to Google Hong Kong and opportunistic Baidu, Inc., thus become the most popular search engine in China. Baidu is also considered by many as a nuisance since Baidu’s toolbar comes as an additional freeware package (we’d rather call it bloatware) when certain Windows-based software is installed.

photo credit: Stuck in Customs via photopin cc

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