Spotify says it will begin trading shares on the NYSE on April 3rd



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FAT news — From Around Twitter and the Internet — 2018, week 10


If you’ve been optimizing your YouTube video descriptions, good on you. A positive surprise might be coming your way.

The initial version of Google Clips requires effort, isn’t cheap and has many shortcomings, according to The Verge:


And these pics have GOTTA BE green-screened, amirite? If you know, email me at AlexYongNYC@gmail.com

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FAT news — From Around Twitter — 2018, week 8



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Attention NYC: If you don’t have cable TV and you can’t get an over the air signal, look into Locast.org

tech-influencers-IWI-lands0PR-friendly

David Goodfriend is an attorney and advocate in Washington, D.C. He is a former Clinton Administration aide, where he served as Deputy Staff Secretary to the 42nd American President. Goodfriend was a legal advisor to FCC Commissioner Susan Ness. He graduated summa cum laude from Beloit College and is co-host of “Left Jab” on Sirius-XM Satellite Radio. Goodfriend is also the founder and Chairman of Sports Fans Coalition, a coalition of sports activists, fighting to give sports fans greater voice in public policy impacting professional and collegiate sports. Goodfriend was a co-founder and EVP/General Counsel of Air America Radio, and was Vice President of Law and Public Policy at DISH Network, EchoStar Satellite LLC (DISH Network).February 9, 2018

Q: I feel free TV is one of those things people hear about but many folks don’t act on it — because we sometimes question whether we’re dancing with illegal groups if we do, etc. What are the statutes about free TV and accessing it?

David Goodfriend:

There’s actually a very thorough, well-reasoned legal argument that’s been presented to me and to members of my board by an outside law firm that’s very well regarded in the copyright field. What they told us is, the copyright statute itself, since 1976, has had a provision that says any non-profit can retransmit a broadcast signal provided that the non-profit doesn’t benefit directly or indirectly financially, and if it charges a fee, it only charges enough to cover costs. That’s it. That has been on the books since 1976, and it’s that provision that so-called ‘translator stations’ have always used for more than four decades to justify what they’re doing.

Q: So we should think of it like an antenna? Is it easy?

David Goodfriend:

A translator station is just an antenna, basically, that receives the TV signal and then boosts it, sends out another over-the-air signal so that the broadcast signal can reach the outer extremities of a market, and that’s been done by non-profits under this statute for decades, since 1976. It’s never been challenged by broadcasters or anybody else; it’s never even been litigated. The statutory provision just sits on the books and has been used, and no one’s ever had an argument over it.
Sports Fans Coalition formed a New York chapter last year called Sports Fans Coalition New York that’s organized under the non-profit corporate laws of New York, and we started our own translator service. The difference is this is over the internet instead of over the air. We restrict access to only people within the New York City five boroughs.
If you’ve got a computer or a smartphone or a tablet, go to www.LoCast.org. The site shows a channel guide; you can click on a channel and watch. The name locast is from “local” and “broadcast” put together. There are 15 stations for New York being streamed to New Yorkers, and the goal is the exact same goal the translator stations have always had which is: broadcasting is supposed to be available for free or at minimal cost to the public – everybody in the local market. And if you cannot get an over the air signal, and you don’t subscribe to cable, we’re the answer.

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Q: Who’s on your board and what do they bring to the table?

David Goodfriend:

Well, in the New York non-profit there’s three [board members] — there’s myself, Habiba Alcindor, and Phillip Berenbroick, who’s a public interest attorney based in Washington. All three of us also serve on the Board of Directors for Sports Fans Coalition, the main non-profit that’s been around since 2009. So, the New York chapter currently has a board comprises a subset of board members from the national chapter.
I really was hopeful Habiba would participate, not only because she is local but because she cares so much about non-profit advocacy and non-profit activity. She’s really been a sort-of ‘keeper of the flame’ for what it means to have a non-profit mission. So, for example, we’re increasingly reaching out to residents of public housing in New York City to say: ‘We’ve got a lower cost option for you, if you don’t want to pay for cable and you can’t get an over the air signal, we have an option for you.’ And she’s been a really good evangelist, if you will, of that proposition.




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FAT news — From Around Twitter (and YouTube) — 2018, week 3


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FAT news — From Around Twitter — 2018, week 1

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MoviePass as a stocking stuffer? You better stuff some instructions in there too

MoviePass, the “all the movies you can watch” card (currently priced at $9.95 a month), is hoping you’re such a happy user that you’ll gift it as a stocking stuffer this holiday season.

Accepted at 91 percent of all theaters nationwide, even small indie ones, the card sounds like a great gift to receive. At such a low price point, it’s tempting to be that cool friend who ushers others into the world of MoviePass.

But the company knows they’ve made mistakes dating back to the summer (when they announced the lower monthly cost, down from $30something) til now. A visit to Twitter and Facebook reveals half a year’s worth of snarky user complaints hurled at MoviePass. But a new user — especially somebody who’s never heard of it and receives one as a gift — might initially think MoviePass is about convenience, until they learn about the precise steps needed to make it all work smoothly.

For example, let’s say you want to see a much-hyped movie at a prime hour, on opening night. You know for damn sure it’s going to be sold out. Just because you have a MoviePass doesn’t mean you’re able to easily get a ticket in advance. In fact, you can’t. To get around that, you can physically go to the theater earlier that day. This doesn’t qualify as “convenient.” The MoviePass app requires you to be within 100 yards of the theater you intend to use. You launch the app, hoping its proximity sensors work, and pick the movie and showtime.

This assigns a temporary code which you don’t see into your account. The physical MoviePass, which syncs with the app, can now be “read” in the correct way and a ticket can be printed.

To get the ticket, swipe at the kiosk. Or have a ticket clerk do the swipe; either way is fine. (Note: MoviePass the company pays theaters full price for each movie seen. Customers/giftees don’t need to think about this; it’s just part of the MoviePass B2B strategy for now) If we had to guess, a gifted MoviePass will not come with any sort of printed FAQ or trifold. Recent attempts to ask their marketing agency were not answered.

So what does MoviePass need this holiday season? It pretty much needs to pray for perfection — to undo the summer tarnish.

Their customers who had negative issues during the low-price push now realize that that’s just the way things can sometimes go with scale. In an earlier conversation with the marketing agency assisting MoviePass, we were told MoviePass has learned a lot this year and that reducing mishaps is an ongoing priority.

Mishaps and unpreparedness led to a flood of customers airing gripes and warnings on social media in the latter half of 2017. Complaints such as technical errors with the MoviePass app or card — or both. But the waiting people went through for the card to arrive in the mail (sometimes 6 weeks or longer) was the #1 gripe during that time.

With Christmas only days away, nobody’s gonna tolerate even a 3-week delay. Can you imagine? A sequel (MoviePass Blunders II anyone?) would suck for the company’s image, especially during the holidays. On the user side: It’s bad enough you’re buying a cheap gift, it’s super wack if it doesn’t arrive on time and/or has technical glitches.

For more “caveat emptor”, I suggest you find any article about MoviePass on Gizmodo and scroll to the reader comments.

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